top of page

While we won't be seeing Porsche's new and improved Panamera in full until November 24, the automaker just couldn't wait to pull the wraps off the model's redone interior. The main focus is catching up on the electric Taycan, which manages to pack much more tech into its similarly-sized cabin. The latest Panamera looks to keep up with its battery-powered sibling by adding more screens, albeit with a familiar interior layout.




The changes start in front of the driver, where the 12.6-inch gauge cluster loses its hood and goes fully digital. Alongside it, there's a revised infotainment display that integrates Porsche's "Driver Experience" control layout, which places a focus on cutting down the menus for simpler interactions. And if you've stepped into a Taycan or Cayenne recently, you wouldn't be too surprised to hear that the Panamera has adopted a new passenger display. Sitting right alongside the central infotainment system, the display allows the front passenger to access the likes of YouTube and various system controls. Luckily for those who aren't the biggest fans of tech, this is merely optional.


Ignore the added screens, and you'll notice that the overall cabin layout remains familiar. There's still a wide, slanted center console between the driver and passenger, and the Sport Chrono analog timepiece is still positioned on top of the dashboard. And while the infotainment has been stretched to include a passenger display, its general position within the dash hasn't changed much.


That's not to say Porsche left the physical details competely untouched. Starting with the simplified center console, many of the physical buttons have transitioned to touch-sensitive controls, and the old gear shift lever has been reduced to a small toggle on the dashboard. There are also new finless air vents (they can be controlled electronically), which serve as bookends for the Panamera's expansive digital real estate. The sedan also features dazzling ambient lighting spanning most of its dashboard. All models also gain improved seating materials, and roomier Panamera Executive models boast extra comfort for rear passengers with their reshaped rear seats, which claim to diminish fatigue on longer trips.



As for the rest of the car, Porsche confirmed this past September that the Panamera would offer four different plug-in hybrud powertrains, as PHEVs are said to make up for nearly all of the sedan's sales. The upgraded hybrids are expected to use the larger 25.9 kWh batteries that debuted in the latest Cayenne, which should result in significant improvements for electric-only range.


Do you think the Panamera's new interior is an improvement?

Image Credits: Porsche
Revealed
Nov 10, 2023
 •

2024 Porsche Panamera Shows Off Its Screen-Heavy New Interior

The new cabin appears to borrow cues from the Taycan EV and the latest Cayenne.

While we won't be seeing Porsche's new and improved Panamera in full until November 24, the automaker just couldn't wait to pull the wraps off the model's redone interior. The main focus is catching up on the electric Taycan, which manages to pack much more tech into its similarly-sized cabin. The latest Panamera looks to keep up with its battery-powered sibling by adding more screens, albeit with a familiar interior layout.




The changes start in front of the driver, where the 12.6-inch gauge cluster loses its hood and goes fully digital. Alongside it, there's a revised infotainment display that integrates Porsche's "Driver Experience" control layout, which places a focus on cutting down the menus for simpler interactions. And if you've stepped into a Taycan or Cayenne recently, you wouldn't be too surprised to hear that the Panamera has adopted a new passenger display. Sitting right alongside the central infotainment system, the display allows the front passenger to access the likes of YouTube and various system controls. Luckily for those who aren't the biggest fans of tech, this is merely optional.


Ignore the added screens, and you'll notice that the overall cabin layout remains familiar. There's still a wide, slanted center console between the driver and passenger, and the Sport Chrono analog timepiece is still positioned on top of the dashboard. And while the infotainment has been stretched to include a passenger display, its general position within the dash hasn't changed much.


That's not to say Porsche left the physical details competely untouched. Starting with the simplified center console, many of the physical buttons have transitioned to touch-sensitive controls, and the old gear shift lever has been reduced to a small toggle on the dashboard. There are also new finless air vents (they can be controlled electronically), which serve as bookends for the Panamera's expansive digital real estate. The sedan also features dazzling ambient lighting spanning most of its dashboard. All models also gain improved seating materials, and roomier Panamera Executive models boast extra comfort for rear passengers with their reshaped rear seats, which claim to diminish fatigue on longer trips.



As for the rest of the car, Porsche confirmed this past September that the Panamera would offer four different plug-in hybrud powertrains, as PHEVs are said to make up for nearly all of the sedan's sales. The upgraded hybrids are expected to use the larger 25.9 kWh batteries that debuted in the latest Cayenne, which should result in significant improvements for electric-only range.


Do you think the Panamera's new interior is an improvement?

Image Credits: Porsche

More From 

Revealed

2025 Acura MDX Introduces Styling Updates And Ditches Trackpad Infotainment

2025 Acura MDX Introduces Styling Updates And Ditches Trackpad Infotainment

2025 Buick Enclave Gets A Glow-Up And A Growth Spurt, Adds More Tech

2025 Buick Enclave Gets A Glow-Up And A Growth Spurt, Adds More Tech

2025 Nissan Kicks Breaks Cover With Blocky Looks And More Punch

2025 Nissan Kicks Breaks Cover With Blocky Looks And More Punch

2024 Porsche Panamera Shows Off Its Screen-Heavy New Interior

Sign up for our newsletter.

Get industry updates sent straight to you, designed to offer a simple glance at the motoring world.

bottom of page