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"E Performance" is a name that ruined the Mercedes-AMG C63, because with that mouthful of a badge came the dreaded hybrid four-cylinder that ended the reign of the lauded V8. So when that same name is applied to the high-output flagship variant of the AMG GT sports car, it really doesn't do things justice. Here, the twin-turbo V8 manages to keep its spot under the hood, and bolts on a plug-in hybrid system to make an otherworldly 805 hp and 1,047 lb-ft of torque. What's in a name, anyway?




Assisting the 603-hp 4.0 liter twin-turbo V8 is the same F1-derived hybrid technology that we saw in the SL63 droptop, and it uses a 201-hp, permanently-excited electric motor in the rear to push output to a total of 805 hp, which far exceeds the standard 577-hp GT63 that sits just below it in the lineup. The horses are sent galloping from the motor to the rear wheels through a two-speed transmission and limited-slip differential, though power can also be routed up front for additional traction. It's also worth reiterating that this powertrain produces a ballistic 1,047 lb-ft of torque.


With all that extra power, the E Performance rockets from 0 to 60 mph three-tenths faster than the regular GT63 coupe, with a face-melting time of 2.7 seconds. Eventually, the hybrid sports car reaches a top speed of 199 mph. Being a plug-in hybrid, the E Performance has an EV-only mode among the eight total drive modes, which also include Sport, Sport+, and Race.


A lightweight 6.1-kWh battery pack provides energy to the motors. It resides above the rear axle, and it's hooked up to a direct cooling system that AMG claims can store more thermal energy and has a much higher heat capacity than water-cooled systems. Much like the batteries in the automaker's Formula 1 race cars, this pack prioritizes instant power over range. With that being said, a 3.7-kW onboard AC charger recharges the battery, and there are four different regeneration levels, including an EV-inspired one-pedal driving mode.



Compared to the rest of the AMG GT lineup, the E Performance boasts a number of aerodynamic improvements. Most notable among them is a new carbon piece attached to the underbody ahead of the engine area, which lowers by up to 1.6 inches when a speed of 50 mph is reached. The resulting Venturi effect keeps the car closer to the ground and reduces front lift at high speeds. The E Performance also deploys its retractable rear spoiler at speeds above 50 mph, and it features a total of five different angles depending on drag and stability.


AMG's active ride control system is also marked as standard on the E Performance, and it utilizes active hydraulics paired with adaptive dampers. Each damper features a pair of hydraulic connections, and all of them are interconnected to lessen roll while also enabling a widened roll spring rate. In other words, the hybrid AMG is capable of delivering as both a pleasant daily driver and an agile performance machine. Further bolstering stability and cornering performance is a standard rear-wheel steering system.


Bringing this 805-hp AMG to a stop is a robust braking system that incorporates six-piston fixed calipers in front, along with single-piston floating calipers in the rear. The front calipers clamp onto 16.5-inch carbon-ceramic brake discs, while the rear ones are paired with 15-inch discs.


On the outside, there is little differentiation between the E Performance and the rest of the AMG GT lineup. A rear charging port serves as the main indicator that this is the hybrid variant, though there is also "E Performance" badging on the front fenders, along with a red "GT 63 S" logo on the trunk lid. There are also twin trapezoidal tailpipes and Tantalum Grey 20-inch wheels, though the standard 10-spoke design can be switched out for other options in both 20- and 21-inch sizes.



Inside, you're getting the same screen-heavy interior as the rest of the AMG GT lineup. Power-adjustable, massaging AMG sports seats come standard, but they can be switched out for a set of performance bucket seats. Buyers can also choose from an assortment of different leather and microfiber upholstery options, and additional options can be had through the Manufaktur Signature program, which is now applicable for customers in the U.S.


The GT63 S E Performance will make its way to U.S. dealers towards the end of this year, though pricing is yet to be revealed. It won't be cheap, though, as the standard GT63 already demands nearly $200,000 before any options.



Image Credits: Mercedes
Revealed
Apr 27, 2024
 •

2025 Mercedes-AMG GT63 S E Performance Tops Lineup With Hybrid V8

The plug-in hybrid hooks up to a twin-turbo V8 to make a wild 805 hp.

"E Performance" is a name that ruined the Mercedes-AMG C63, because with that mouthful of a badge came the dreaded hybrid four-cylinder that ended the reign of the lauded V8. So when that same name is applied to the high-output flagship variant of the AMG GT sports car, it really doesn't do things justice. Here, the twin-turbo V8 manages to keep its spot under the hood, and bolts on a plug-in hybrid system to make an otherworldly 805 hp and 1,047 lb-ft of torque. What's in a name, anyway?




Assisting the 603-hp 4.0 liter twin-turbo V8 is the same F1-derived hybrid technology that we saw in the SL63 droptop, and it uses a 201-hp, permanently-excited electric motor in the rear to push output to a total of 805 hp, which far exceeds the standard 577-hp GT63 that sits just below it in the lineup. The horses are sent galloping from the motor to the rear wheels through a two-speed transmission and limited-slip differential, though power can also be routed up front for additional traction. It's also worth reiterating that this powertrain produces a ballistic 1,047 lb-ft of torque.


With all that extra power, the E Performance rockets from 0 to 60 mph three-tenths faster than the regular GT63 coupe, with a face-melting time of 2.7 seconds. Eventually, the hybrid sports car reaches a top speed of 199 mph. Being a plug-in hybrid, the E Performance has an EV-only mode among the eight total drive modes, which also include Sport, Sport+, and Race.


A lightweight 6.1-kWh battery pack provides energy to the motors. It resides above the rear axle, and it's hooked up to a direct cooling system that AMG claims can store more thermal energy and has a much higher heat capacity than water-cooled systems. Much like the batteries in the automaker's Formula 1 race cars, this pack prioritizes instant power over range. With that being said, a 3.7-kW onboard AC charger recharges the battery, and there are four different regeneration levels, including an EV-inspired one-pedal driving mode.



Compared to the rest of the AMG GT lineup, the E Performance boasts a number of aerodynamic improvements. Most notable among them is a new carbon piece attached to the underbody ahead of the engine area, which lowers by up to 1.6 inches when a speed of 50 mph is reached. The resulting Venturi effect keeps the car closer to the ground and reduces front lift at high speeds. The E Performance also deploys its retractable rear spoiler at speeds above 50 mph, and it features a total of five different angles depending on drag and stability.


AMG's active ride control system is also marked as standard on the E Performance, and it utilizes active hydraulics paired with adaptive dampers. Each damper features a pair of hydraulic connections, and all of them are interconnected to lessen roll while also enabling a widened roll spring rate. In other words, the hybrid AMG is capable of delivering as both a pleasant daily driver and an agile performance machine. Further bolstering stability and cornering performance is a standard rear-wheel steering system.


Bringing this 805-hp AMG to a stop is a robust braking system that incorporates six-piston fixed calipers in front, along with single-piston floating calipers in the rear. The front calipers clamp onto 16.5-inch carbon-ceramic brake discs, while the rear ones are paired with 15-inch discs.


On the outside, there is little differentiation between the E Performance and the rest of the AMG GT lineup. A rear charging port serves as the main indicator that this is the hybrid variant, though there is also "E Performance" badging on the front fenders, along with a red "GT 63 S" logo on the trunk lid. There are also twin trapezoidal tailpipes and Tantalum Grey 20-inch wheels, though the standard 10-spoke design can be switched out for other options in both 20- and 21-inch sizes.



Inside, you're getting the same screen-heavy interior as the rest of the AMG GT lineup. Power-adjustable, massaging AMG sports seats come standard, but they can be switched out for a set of performance bucket seats. Buyers can also choose from an assortment of different leather and microfiber upholstery options, and additional options can be had through the Manufaktur Signature program, which is now applicable for customers in the U.S.


The GT63 S E Performance will make its way to U.S. dealers towards the end of this year, though pricing is yet to be revealed. It won't be cheap, though, as the standard GT63 already demands nearly $200,000 before any options.



Image Credits: Mercedes

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