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Mini has bestowed a clean-sweep redesign upon its Cooper hatchback, in what could be the model's biggest overhaul since the first BMW-derived hatchback replaced the classic Austin Mini. The dramatically simplified design of the latest Cooper brings it back to its minimalist roots, though its newfound simplicity reveals a more upscale feel inside and out. Even the name has been changed, as the model moves away from the Mini hatch name, fully embracing the all-familiar Cooper moniker. This means other models like the Countryman will be dropping the Cooper parts of their own names. It's also worth noting that this new Mini has gone full EV, though the existing ICE car will stick alongside this new model in the years to come, even receiving a small refresh that will be revealed later.





While this still looks like a Mini at first glance, it's become much simpler, lending it a much more mature look. The lines that remain have been straightened out, and the flattened wheel arches are no longer clad in black plastic. Up front, the grille hasn't changed much, though what was once a large mesh grille is now outlined by a distinctive white frame. Flanking the grille on each side is a pair of the same iconic circular headlights, which lose their chrome outlines and add LED technology with optional three-mode DRL signatures. Elsewhere, the new Cooper rides on standard 16-inch wheels, which can be upgraded to larger 17- and 18-inchers. Moving past the new flush door handles and to the rear, the Cooper loses its iconic circular taillights, trading them out for more modern triangular ones.




The interior nails the minimalist theme, harkening back to the original Mini while putting a charmingly premium spin on it. The circular touchscreen carries on as the centerpiece of the dashboard, cleverly combining the digital instrument cluster and infotainment system into a single rounded display. Fortunately, Mini has finally managed to create a true circular touchscreen, which replaces the ill-fitted rectangular display that was stuffed into a round plastic panel. The OLED screen, which serves as a nod to the circular speedometer found inside the original Mini, houses the brand's playful new infotainment, which includes a voice-activated personal assistant that can be displayed as either a cartoonish Mini or a dog named Spike. Aside from the sharp display, only a small amount of physical controls are left, with most of them found within the oval switch panel that also takes inspiration from the classic '59 Mini. The rest of the sculpted dash features stylish horizontal air vents, while customers who prefer not to turn their head to view the speedometer can opt for a head-up display.





At launch, the Cooper EV will be available with two different front-wheel drive powertrains, both offering more punch than what's found in the current Mini. At the entry point of the city car's powertrain lineup sits the Cooper E, which produces 181 hp and 214 lb-ft of torque from a single motor. This setup propells it from 0-62 mph in 7.3 seconds, and is fed by a 40.7 kWh battery that enables a range of up to 190 miles. Meanwhile, the Cooper SE generates even more power thanks to its larger 54.2 kWh battery, though it sticks with just one motor. This powertrain combination boosts output to 215 hp and 243 lb-ft of torque, while range get bumped up to 250 miles. While the SE technically charges faster than the base Cooper E, its larger battery means it will still take 30 minutes to charge from 10 to 80 percent, which is the same as in the E.


Interestingly, the Cooper E and SE aren't actually trim levels––instead, they denote each of the two powertrains. As for the real trim levels, the new Cooper comes in four of them. The first is the Essential Trim, which features silver accents inside and out, along with black sports seats and a minimalistic textile brand on the dashboard. Moving up the trim ladder will bring you to the Classic Trim, which adds two-tone textile fabric on the doors and dashboard, synthetic leather upholstery, and a three-spoke steering wheel to replace the standard two-spoke wheel. The Favoured trim features a two-tone houndstooth pattern inside, along with perforated Vescin sports seats and a silver grille adorning the exterior. Topping the range is the familiar JCW trim, which switches things up for a sportier look as seen in the ICE Minis. This means black sports seats in synthetic leather with red stitching, along with a gloss black grille and exclusive front and rear bumper designs. Options include black hood stripes and a Chili Red roof to spice things up even more.


Personalization expands to the new Cooper's seven different driving modes, with the first three––Core, Green, and Go-Kart––allowing drivers to adjust throttle response and regenerative braking, along with the car's array of synthesized soundtracks and themes for the infotainment display. The remaining four––Balance, Timeless, Personal, and Vivid––place even more emphasis on customization, enabling drivers to create custom infotainment themes with their own images.




While pricing hasn't been revealed just yet, European customers can expect a launch date in spring 2024, with the updated ICE Mini set to arrive that following summer. As for North American buyers, both Minis will arrive slightly later as 2025 model year vehicles.


Would you buy the new Cooper EV or stick with the gas Mini?

Image Credits: Mini
Revealed
Sep 2, 2023
 •

2025 Mini Cooper EV Reinvents The Iconic City Car With Simplified Looks

While the changes focus on minimalism, they represent a huge departure from the current Mini.

Mini has bestowed a clean-sweep redesign upon its Cooper hatchback, in what could be the model's biggest overhaul since the first BMW-derived hatchback replaced the classic Austin Mini. The dramatically simplified design of the latest Cooper brings it back to its minimalist roots, though its newfound simplicity reveals a more upscale feel inside and out. Even the name has been changed, as the model moves away from the Mini hatch name, fully embracing the all-familiar Cooper moniker. This means other models like the Countryman will be dropping the Cooper parts of their own names. It's also worth noting that this new Mini has gone full EV, though the existing ICE car will stick alongside this new model in the years to come, even receiving a small refresh that will be revealed later.





While this still looks like a Mini at first glance, it's become much simpler, lending it a much more mature look. The lines that remain have been straightened out, and the flattened wheel arches are no longer clad in black plastic. Up front, the grille hasn't changed much, though what was once a large mesh grille is now outlined by a distinctive white frame. Flanking the grille on each side is a pair of the same iconic circular headlights, which lose their chrome outlines and add LED technology with optional three-mode DRL signatures. Elsewhere, the new Cooper rides on standard 16-inch wheels, which can be upgraded to larger 17- and 18-inchers. Moving past the new flush door handles and to the rear, the Cooper loses its iconic circular taillights, trading them out for more modern triangular ones.




The interior nails the minimalist theme, harkening back to the original Mini while putting a charmingly premium spin on it. The circular touchscreen carries on as the centerpiece of the dashboard, cleverly combining the digital instrument cluster and infotainment system into a single rounded display. Fortunately, Mini has finally managed to create a true circular touchscreen, which replaces the ill-fitted rectangular display that was stuffed into a round plastic panel. The OLED screen, which serves as a nod to the circular speedometer found inside the original Mini, houses the brand's playful new infotainment, which includes a voice-activated personal assistant that can be displayed as either a cartoonish Mini or a dog named Spike. Aside from the sharp display, only a small amount of physical controls are left, with most of them found within the oval switch panel that also takes inspiration from the classic '59 Mini. The rest of the sculpted dash features stylish horizontal air vents, while customers who prefer not to turn their head to view the speedometer can opt for a head-up display.





At launch, the Cooper EV will be available with two different front-wheel drive powertrains, both offering more punch than what's found in the current Mini. At the entry point of the city car's powertrain lineup sits the Cooper E, which produces 181 hp and 214 lb-ft of torque from a single motor. This setup propells it from 0-62 mph in 7.3 seconds, and is fed by a 40.7 kWh battery that enables a range of up to 190 miles. Meanwhile, the Cooper SE generates even more power thanks to its larger 54.2 kWh battery, though it sticks with just one motor. This powertrain combination boosts output to 215 hp and 243 lb-ft of torque, while range get bumped up to 250 miles. While the SE technically charges faster than the base Cooper E, its larger battery means it will still take 30 minutes to charge from 10 to 80 percent, which is the same as in the E.


Interestingly, the Cooper E and SE aren't actually trim levels––instead, they denote each of the two powertrains. As for the real trim levels, the new Cooper comes in four of them. The first is the Essential Trim, which features silver accents inside and out, along with black sports seats and a minimalistic textile brand on the dashboard. Moving up the trim ladder will bring you to the Classic Trim, which adds two-tone textile fabric on the doors and dashboard, synthetic leather upholstery, and a three-spoke steering wheel to replace the standard two-spoke wheel. The Favoured trim features a two-tone houndstooth pattern inside, along with perforated Vescin sports seats and a silver grille adorning the exterior. Topping the range is the familiar JCW trim, which switches things up for a sportier look as seen in the ICE Minis. This means black sports seats in synthetic leather with red stitching, along with a gloss black grille and exclusive front and rear bumper designs. Options include black hood stripes and a Chili Red roof to spice things up even more.


Personalization expands to the new Cooper's seven different driving modes, with the first three––Core, Green, and Go-Kart––allowing drivers to adjust throttle response and regenerative braking, along with the car's array of synthesized soundtracks and themes for the infotainment display. The remaining four––Balance, Timeless, Personal, and Vivid––place even more emphasis on customization, enabling drivers to create custom infotainment themes with their own images.




While pricing hasn't been revealed just yet, European customers can expect a launch date in spring 2024, with the updated ICE Mini set to arrive that following summer. As for North American buyers, both Minis will arrive slightly later as 2025 model year vehicles.


Would you buy the new Cooper EV or stick with the gas Mini?

Image Credits: Mini

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2025 Mini Cooper EV Reinvents The Iconic City Car With Simplified Looks

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