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It took a remarkable 15 years, but Toyota has finally taken the wraps off its sixth-generation 4Runner. While the stellar sales of its predecessor leaves some XXL-sized shoes to fill, the arrival of a revamped engine lineup, 21st century tech, and a fresh new TNGA-F chassis ensure that buyers will love this one just the same.




On the outside, the 4Runner is clearly derived from the latest Tacoma pickup, but there is still at least some distinction. The mean-looking new front end incorporates an extra-wide grille flanked by chunky headlights, and the redesigned bumpers sit high off the ground. Sculpted fenders with bulkier flares add three inches of width to the body-on-frame SUV, which comes as a result of the suspension's widened track. The wheelbase has grown by as much as 2.4 inches to allow for more body-mount clearance towards the front, and this has also enabled larger tire sizes, including the monstrous Toyo Open Country AT III tires on the TRD Pro and Trailhunter that measure 33 inches tall. The muscular look continues along the sides, and the rearmost side window now extends up to the roof as a nod to the first- and second-generation 4Runner. The rear is a bit more evolutionary, and it retains its predecessor's heralded power-folding rear windshield.


An Interior That Mixes Old With New





The cabin gets a much-needed makeover, though Toyota has made the prudent decision to give its adventure-seeking buyers some chunky buttons and knobs just like before. However, we are also glad to see the 4Runner learn a few new tricks with an available 14-inch touchscreen display, which runs Toyota's latest infotainment and incorporates wireless Apple CarPlay and Android Auto. This screen, which comes in smaller sizes on cheaper models, is the same one found in the Tacoma pickup. As a matter of fact, the entire dashboard is a mirror of the Tacoma's, save for some materials and colors, which means we'll be getting an ergonomically-sound layout with plenty of storage cubbies. Oh, and some models will come with a removable JBL speaker on top of the dash.


The latest 4Runner continues to offer an optional third row as well, though the placement of the new hybrid battery pack beneath the rear cargo floor means that the extra seats will likely be exclusive to models with the non-hybrid i-Force powertrain. But for those that do have the third row, Toyota has made access easier with a one-step tumble as opposed to last year's more complicated flip and fold layout.


Goodbye V6, Hello i-Force



As standard, the 4Runner packs a new 2.4-liter i-Force turbocharged inline-four under the hood, which delivers the same 278 hp and 317 lb-ft of torque as it does in the base Tacoma. Power is sent to the wheels through a brand new eight-speed automatic, which should make the new 4Runner feel much more responsive than its V6-powered predecessor that paired its engine to an archaic five-speed transmission. The new inline-four will be the sole offering on SR5 and TRD Sport models, and will serve as the baseline engine for the TRD Off-Road and Limited. While Toyota hasn't revealed any fuel economy estimates, we expect major improvements compared to the old model.


For those who want some extra power and efficiency, the 4Runner is available as a hybrid for the first time. Taking the SUV into the 21st century is a new 2.4-liter i-Force Max powertrain, which takes the base 278-hp inline-four and eight-speed automatic combination and hooks up an electric motor in between. The result is a healthy 326 hp and 465 lb-ft of torque, and while Toyota says it didn't focus on fuel efficiency when developing this powertrain, we still expect sizable gains. The i-Force Max comes as an optional upgrade for the TRD Off-Road and Limited models, though it's standard on the TRD Pro, Trailhunter, and spec'd-out Platinum.


New Bones For Modern-Day Off-Roading




Underneath its heavily redesigned sheetmetal, the 4Runner finally ditches the ancient underpinnings of its predecessor. The body-on-frame SUV has made the switch to the TNGA-F architecture, which is shared with the rest of Toyota's new trucks––that includes the Tacoma, Tundra, and Land Cruiser, to name just a few.


In spite of the new underpinnings, Toyota hasn't necessarily reinvented the wheel with the new 4Runner's suspension. It uses a control-arm layout up front and a multilink live axle in the back, which is nearly the same setup as before. However, Toyota has reworked a majority of the suspension system, and it will feature slight differences in tuning depending on the model.


For example, the TRD Pro will be tuned for intense desert running, and the model adds new Fox QS3 dampers. Meanwhile, the new Trailhunter will, as its name suggests, scour the trails and embark on slower overlanding journeys, featuring a set of ARB/Old Man Emu dampers, extra skid plates, and stronger frame-mounted rock sliders. Both the TRD Pro and Trailhunter will be fitted with external rear reservoirs, and an electronic rear differential locker will come with the TRD Off-Road, TRD Pro, and Trailhunter.


The 4Runner is also getting rid of its optional KDSS hydraulically-defeatable front and rear anti-roll bars, replacing them with a newly-available disconnecting front anti-roll bar for the TRD Pro and Trailhunter. This feature will be optional on the TRD Off-Road.


It's Coming As Soon As This Fall



The 4Runner is bringing its extensive updates to showrooms much sooner than expected, and that's awesome news. Toyota plans to end our excruciating 15-year wait this fall, with official pricing and equipment details expected to arrive shortly before the SUV's launch.


Image Credits: Toyota
Revealed
Apr 21, 2024
 •

2025 Toyota 4Runner Brings Extensive Updates And A Touch Of Modernity

Changes include a new set of i-Force powertrains and a Trailhunter overlanding trim.

It took a remarkable 15 years, but Toyota has finally taken the wraps off its sixth-generation 4Runner. While the stellar sales of its predecessor leaves some XXL-sized shoes to fill, the arrival of a revamped engine lineup, 21st century tech, and a fresh new TNGA-F chassis ensure that buyers will love this one just the same.




On the outside, the 4Runner is clearly derived from the latest Tacoma pickup, but there is still at least some distinction. The mean-looking new front end incorporates an extra-wide grille flanked by chunky headlights, and the redesigned bumpers sit high off the ground. Sculpted fenders with bulkier flares add three inches of width to the body-on-frame SUV, which comes as a result of the suspension's widened track. The wheelbase has grown by as much as 2.4 inches to allow for more body-mount clearance towards the front, and this has also enabled larger tire sizes, including the monstrous Toyo Open Country AT III tires on the TRD Pro and Trailhunter that measure 33 inches tall. The muscular look continues along the sides, and the rearmost side window now extends up to the roof as a nod to the first- and second-generation 4Runner. The rear is a bit more evolutionary, and it retains its predecessor's heralded power-folding rear windshield.


An Interior That Mixes Old With New





The cabin gets a much-needed makeover, though Toyota has made the prudent decision to give its adventure-seeking buyers some chunky buttons and knobs just like before. However, we are also glad to see the 4Runner learn a few new tricks with an available 14-inch touchscreen display, which runs Toyota's latest infotainment and incorporates wireless Apple CarPlay and Android Auto. This screen, which comes in smaller sizes on cheaper models, is the same one found in the Tacoma pickup. As a matter of fact, the entire dashboard is a mirror of the Tacoma's, save for some materials and colors, which means we'll be getting an ergonomically-sound layout with plenty of storage cubbies. Oh, and some models will come with a removable JBL speaker on top of the dash.


The latest 4Runner continues to offer an optional third row as well, though the placement of the new hybrid battery pack beneath the rear cargo floor means that the extra seats will likely be exclusive to models with the non-hybrid i-Force powertrain. But for those that do have the third row, Toyota has made access easier with a one-step tumble as opposed to last year's more complicated flip and fold layout.


Goodbye V6, Hello i-Force



As standard, the 4Runner packs a new 2.4-liter i-Force turbocharged inline-four under the hood, which delivers the same 278 hp and 317 lb-ft of torque as it does in the base Tacoma. Power is sent to the wheels through a brand new eight-speed automatic, which should make the new 4Runner feel much more responsive than its V6-powered predecessor that paired its engine to an archaic five-speed transmission. The new inline-four will be the sole offering on SR5 and TRD Sport models, and will serve as the baseline engine for the TRD Off-Road and Limited. While Toyota hasn't revealed any fuel economy estimates, we expect major improvements compared to the old model.


For those who want some extra power and efficiency, the 4Runner is available as a hybrid for the first time. Taking the SUV into the 21st century is a new 2.4-liter i-Force Max powertrain, which takes the base 278-hp inline-four and eight-speed automatic combination and hooks up an electric motor in between. The result is a healthy 326 hp and 465 lb-ft of torque, and while Toyota says it didn't focus on fuel efficiency when developing this powertrain, we still expect sizable gains. The i-Force Max comes as an optional upgrade for the TRD Off-Road and Limited models, though it's standard on the TRD Pro, Trailhunter, and spec'd-out Platinum.


New Bones For Modern-Day Off-Roading




Underneath its heavily redesigned sheetmetal, the 4Runner finally ditches the ancient underpinnings of its predecessor. The body-on-frame SUV has made the switch to the TNGA-F architecture, which is shared with the rest of Toyota's new trucks––that includes the Tacoma, Tundra, and Land Cruiser, to name just a few.


In spite of the new underpinnings, Toyota hasn't necessarily reinvented the wheel with the new 4Runner's suspension. It uses a control-arm layout up front and a multilink live axle in the back, which is nearly the same setup as before. However, Toyota has reworked a majority of the suspension system, and it will feature slight differences in tuning depending on the model.


For example, the TRD Pro will be tuned for intense desert running, and the model adds new Fox QS3 dampers. Meanwhile, the new Trailhunter will, as its name suggests, scour the trails and embark on slower overlanding journeys, featuring a set of ARB/Old Man Emu dampers, extra skid plates, and stronger frame-mounted rock sliders. Both the TRD Pro and Trailhunter will be fitted with external rear reservoirs, and an electronic rear differential locker will come with the TRD Off-Road, TRD Pro, and Trailhunter.


The 4Runner is also getting rid of its optional KDSS hydraulically-defeatable front and rear anti-roll bars, replacing them with a newly-available disconnecting front anti-roll bar for the TRD Pro and Trailhunter. This feature will be optional on the TRD Off-Road.


It's Coming As Soon As This Fall



The 4Runner is bringing its extensive updates to showrooms much sooner than expected, and that's awesome news. Toyota plans to end our excruciating 15-year wait this fall, with official pricing and equipment details expected to arrive shortly before the SUV's launch.


Image Credits: Toyota

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