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Mercedes-AMG has revealed the base offering for its newly redesigned GT sports car, and it eschews the V8 in favor of an electrically-assisted four-cylinder that pumps out a total of 416 hp. Power for this model is now sent to the rear wheels only, and it can be distinguished from the rest of the GT lineup by its subtler styling and thinner fenders.


To make up for the relative lack of power in this new four-cylinder GT 43, Mercedes is billing this model as one that focuses on handling with its rear-biased mechanics and smaller powertrain. Under the hood there lives a shrunken 2.0 liter four-cylinder, which is assisted by a 48-volt mild hybrid system. There's also an F1-inspired electric exhaust gas turbocharger borrowed from the AMG SL 43 convertible. A nine-speed dual-clutch automatic sends 416 hp and 369 lb-ft of torque to the rear, which means the coupe has a 40-horse advantage over the base SL 43 convertible. In addition, 53 horses separate this four-cylinder GT from the punchier V8-powered GT 53. Acceleration from 0-62 mph comes in 4.6 seconds, before a top speed of 174 mph is reached.




To reflect the smaller engine, Mercedes has given the GT 43 a distinct, albeit watered-down look compared to the V8-equipped GT 53 and GT 63. Up front, there's a simpler grille design, which lets the lower intakes grow in size. The front and rear fenders have been toned down a bit, and the intake just behind each front wheel has been reduced. At the rear, the trapezoid-shaped tailpipes have been switched out for round ones, and the bumpers lose their vertical intakes on either side.


While the standard wheels measure in at 19 inches, buyers can upgrade to larger 21-inch ones. AMG also offers an optional fixed rear wing, along with accent packages that add chrome or black finishes to the exterior trim elements.



The interior greets occupants with the same tech-centric design, with a 11.9-inch touchscreen display propped up in the center alongside a 12.3-inch digital gauge cluster directly in front of the driver. AMG sports seats with Nappa leather upholstery come as standard equipment, though AMG Performance seats are optional as well. Speaking of seats, the European-spec GT 43 comes standard with only two of them, through the 2+2 layout seen in the GT 53 and GT 63 remains available as an option. The U.S.-bound model will not follow that trend, and will instead stick with all four seats as standard.


The GT 43 also comes standard with composite brakes and a steel spring suspension, the latter of which featuring five-link front and rear axles, aluminum shocks, and lightweight coil springs. Options include a more advanced AMG Ride Control Chassis, rear-wheel steering, and an AMG Dynamic Plus package that includes electronically-controlled rear locking differential, dynamic engine mounts, a "Race" driving mode, active underbody aerodynamics, and a yellow finish for the brake calipers.



The Mercedes-AMG GT 43 will make it to U.S. showrooms for the 2025 model year, offering a cheaper price tag than the V8-powered GT 53 and 63––those dive well into the six figures to start. Expect the four-cylinder version to start near the $90,000 mark.


Image Credits: Mercedes
Revealed
Mar 27, 2024
 •

Entry-Level Mercedes-AMG GT 43 Loses V8 And Embraces Four-Cylinder Power

If you want a V8 in your AMG coupe, opt for the higher-end GT 53 or GT 63 instead.

Mercedes-AMG has revealed the base offering for its newly redesigned GT sports car, and it eschews the V8 in favor of an electrically-assisted four-cylinder that pumps out a total of 416 hp. Power for this model is now sent to the rear wheels only, and it can be distinguished from the rest of the GT lineup by its subtler styling and thinner fenders.


To make up for the relative lack of power in this new four-cylinder GT 43, Mercedes is billing this model as one that focuses on handling with its rear-biased mechanics and smaller powertrain. Under the hood there lives a shrunken 2.0 liter four-cylinder, which is assisted by a 48-volt mild hybrid system. There's also an F1-inspired electric exhaust gas turbocharger borrowed from the AMG SL 43 convertible. A nine-speed dual-clutch automatic sends 416 hp and 369 lb-ft of torque to the rear, which means the coupe has a 40-horse advantage over the base SL 43 convertible. In addition, 53 horses separate this four-cylinder GT from the punchier V8-powered GT 53. Acceleration from 0-62 mph comes in 4.6 seconds, before a top speed of 174 mph is reached.




To reflect the smaller engine, Mercedes has given the GT 43 a distinct, albeit watered-down look compared to the V8-equipped GT 53 and GT 63. Up front, there's a simpler grille design, which lets the lower intakes grow in size. The front and rear fenders have been toned down a bit, and the intake just behind each front wheel has been reduced. At the rear, the trapezoid-shaped tailpipes have been switched out for round ones, and the bumpers lose their vertical intakes on either side.


While the standard wheels measure in at 19 inches, buyers can upgrade to larger 21-inch ones. AMG also offers an optional fixed rear wing, along with accent packages that add chrome or black finishes to the exterior trim elements.



The interior greets occupants with the same tech-centric design, with a 11.9-inch touchscreen display propped up in the center alongside a 12.3-inch digital gauge cluster directly in front of the driver. AMG sports seats with Nappa leather upholstery come as standard equipment, though AMG Performance seats are optional as well. Speaking of seats, the European-spec GT 43 comes standard with only two of them, through the 2+2 layout seen in the GT 53 and GT 63 remains available as an option. The U.S.-bound model will not follow that trend, and will instead stick with all four seats as standard.


The GT 43 also comes standard with composite brakes and a steel spring suspension, the latter of which featuring five-link front and rear axles, aluminum shocks, and lightweight coil springs. Options include a more advanced AMG Ride Control Chassis, rear-wheel steering, and an AMG Dynamic Plus package that includes electronically-controlled rear locking differential, dynamic engine mounts, a "Race" driving mode, active underbody aerodynamics, and a yellow finish for the brake calipers.



The Mercedes-AMG GT 43 will make it to U.S. showrooms for the 2025 model year, offering a cheaper price tag than the V8-powered GT 53 and 63––those dive well into the six figures to start. Expect the four-cylinder version to start near the $90,000 mark.


Image Credits: Mercedes

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