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Hyundai and Kia are hitting the fast forward button on their product lifecycles, with refreshes planned for every three years before a full redesign comes another three years later. That means the Hyundai Tucson, which debuted its latest generation for the 2022 model year, is right on cue for a refresh of its own for the 2025 model year.


While the crossover may still seem fresh in most eyes, Hyundai found plenty of things to change for the Tucson's facelift, which has been previewed by the new European model that's set to go on sale in early 2024. The U.S.-spec model should follow closely behind it.




On the outside, the updated Tucson has received some small styling tweaks, but its overall look has largely been kept the same. The front and rear skid plates have been widened to give the crossover a stronger stance, while blockier daytime running lights continue to blend in with the lightly revised grille. The real headlamps are still mounted down below, but have been reshaped along with the bumper for a squarer look. Hyundai didn't provide any images of the Tucson's rear end, though a view of its side profile reveals snazzy new wheel designs and what appears to be light enhancements to the taillights and rear bumper.


The majority of Hyundai's time working on the new Tucson has been invested into the cabin, where the dashboard has been completely overhauled. Gone are the old touch-sensitive buttons, as they've been replaced by none other than your good old physical buttons. Yes, Hyundai has bucked the industry trend for the benefit of ergonomics––along with your sanity when all you're trying to do is lower the temperature––and that's how it should be. Whereas last year's model required the driver to adjust the volume using a screen, there's a new set of knobs to serve that duty the traditional way.


That's not all, as the 12.3-inch touchscreen display has been moved to a higher floating position atop the dash, joining the 12.3-inch digital gauge display under a single panel. Elsewhere, the air vents have been tucked between the larger screens and the relocated switchgear panel, in order to make room for a handy new parcel shelf on the passenger side of the dash. You'll also find a redesigned steering wheel that ditches its Hyundai logo in favor of a simple horizontal line, and the button shifter has been moved from the center console to a stalk behind the wheel. Speaking of the center console, it's also been revised to accomodate an available wireless charger and an expanded front storage area.



Hyundai's European press release didn't specify anything regarding powertrains, so it remains to be seen whether they'll change. Here in the United States, the Tucson offers a 187-hp 2.5 liter four-cylinder as its standard powertrain, which comes with an eight-speed automatic and the choice of either front- or all-wheel drive. At the higher end of the lineup, there's a more powerful, 226-hp Tucson hybrid, along with an even punchier plug-in hybrid variant that delivers 261 hp. Both pair their electric bits with a turbocharged 1.6 liter four-cylinder gas engine.


We'll have to wait to see what's in store for the U.S.-spec model, but expect the changes to be very similar to what's being shown in Europe. The existing 2024 Tucson begins at $27,250 for the standard gas model, so we expect the 2025 version to creep a bit closer to the $30,000 mark.


Thoughts on the new interior?

Image Credits: Hyundai
Revealed
Nov 25, 2023
 •

The 2025 Hyundai Tucson Actually Adds More Buttons, And We're All For It

The refreshed European model gives us a sneak peek at what's coming for the U.S. version.

Hyundai and Kia are hitting the fast forward button on their product lifecycles, with refreshes planned for every three years before a full redesign comes another three years later. That means the Hyundai Tucson, which debuted its latest generation for the 2022 model year, is right on cue for a refresh of its own for the 2025 model year.


While the crossover may still seem fresh in most eyes, Hyundai found plenty of things to change for the Tucson's facelift, which has been previewed by the new European model that's set to go on sale in early 2024. The U.S.-spec model should follow closely behind it.




On the outside, the updated Tucson has received some small styling tweaks, but its overall look has largely been kept the same. The front and rear skid plates have been widened to give the crossover a stronger stance, while blockier daytime running lights continue to blend in with the lightly revised grille. The real headlamps are still mounted down below, but have been reshaped along with the bumper for a squarer look. Hyundai didn't provide any images of the Tucson's rear end, though a view of its side profile reveals snazzy new wheel designs and what appears to be light enhancements to the taillights and rear bumper.


The majority of Hyundai's time working on the new Tucson has been invested into the cabin, where the dashboard has been completely overhauled. Gone are the old touch-sensitive buttons, as they've been replaced by none other than your good old physical buttons. Yes, Hyundai has bucked the industry trend for the benefit of ergonomics––along with your sanity when all you're trying to do is lower the temperature––and that's how it should be. Whereas last year's model required the driver to adjust the volume using a screen, there's a new set of knobs to serve that duty the traditional way.


That's not all, as the 12.3-inch touchscreen display has been moved to a higher floating position atop the dash, joining the 12.3-inch digital gauge display under a single panel. Elsewhere, the air vents have been tucked between the larger screens and the relocated switchgear panel, in order to make room for a handy new parcel shelf on the passenger side of the dash. You'll also find a redesigned steering wheel that ditches its Hyundai logo in favor of a simple horizontal line, and the button shifter has been moved from the center console to a stalk behind the wheel. Speaking of the center console, it's also been revised to accomodate an available wireless charger and an expanded front storage area.



Hyundai's European press release didn't specify anything regarding powertrains, so it remains to be seen whether they'll change. Here in the United States, the Tucson offers a 187-hp 2.5 liter four-cylinder as its standard powertrain, which comes with an eight-speed automatic and the choice of either front- or all-wheel drive. At the higher end of the lineup, there's a more powerful, 226-hp Tucson hybrid, along with an even punchier plug-in hybrid variant that delivers 261 hp. Both pair their electric bits with a turbocharged 1.6 liter four-cylinder gas engine.


We'll have to wait to see what's in store for the U.S.-spec model, but expect the changes to be very similar to what's being shown in Europe. The existing 2024 Tucson begins at $27,250 for the standard gas model, so we expect the 2025 version to creep a bit closer to the $30,000 mark.


Thoughts on the new interior?

Image Credits: Hyundai

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The 2025 Hyundai Tucson Actually Adds More Buttons, And We're All For It

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