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McLaren's latest supercar looks familar, but for a good reason. The 750S is an evolution of the outgoing 720S, adding to its predecessor's formula rather than shaking it up. In fact, only 30 percent of the components found in the 750S have been upgraded or are competely new, and while a small percent of those parts are for vanity purposes, most of the changes are internal. While you can't see most of these adjustments, they add up to big things you'll undoubtedly notice behind the wheel.




The 4.0 liter V8 heart from the 720S carries over to the 750S, but with higher boost pressure that adds 30 horsepower and 22 lb-ft of torque. Do the math and you have a total of 740 hp and 590 lb-ft of torque, bringing total output closer to the track-oriented 765LT. Larger air intakes along the side of the car contribute to improved engine cooling, while a newly combined dual exhaust setup at the rear is said to make the 750S sound angrier. The seven-speed dual-clutch transmission also benefits from some slight improvements, including a shortened final-drive ratio and the ability to prevent downshifts that would cause the engine to over-rev.



While the 750S gains more power, it manages to shed some weight in the process. Up to 66 pounds, to be exact. One of the biggest contributors would be the new forged wheels, which are offered as standard equipment. McLaren says they are the lightest wheels ever used for a series-production vehicle, and in the 750S's case, they save 30.4 pounds. The 750S also features newly standard carbon fiber racing seats, which shed a whopping 38.6 pounds compared to the 720S. For those who really care about weight, there are even lighter carbon fiber seats available on the options list. Other areas that help with weight reduction are the lighter windshield, column-mounted digital instrument display, and some tweaks to the suspension, which combined save 11.9 pounds. In total, the 750S coupe is 66 pounds lighter than the 720S, while the 750S Spider is just 108 pounds heavier than the coupe.


While convertibles are naturally heavier and thus marginally slower than their fixed-roof counterparts, the 750S Spider manages to hang on tightly to the coupe's numbers. Despite carrying a hefty retractable hardtop along for the ride, it matches the coupe's 2.7-second run from 0 to 60. It also mimics the coupe's top speed of 206 miles per hour.




Meanwhile, a new brake booster and vacuum pump let the 750S screech to a halt faster, while an even more enhanced braking system can be found with a new package that borrows parts from the Senna hypercar. The optional package carbon-ceramic rotors measuring 15.4 inches, as well as one-piece front brake calipers that are said to last longer than typical calipers. Braking at higher speeds has been improved with a lighter active rear wing, which also offers more downforce than the unit found in the 720S.



Just like the exterior, the 750S's cabin doesn't stray too far from the 720S that came before it. Infotainment has been upgraded to an 8-inch touchscreen display that now supports Apple CarPlay, but no Android auto. Other highlights include a Bower & Wilkins stereo system, a newly power-adjustable steering column, customizable ambient lighting, and an optional clear engine cover that allows the driver to see the 750S's glorious V8 in action behind them.


U.S. dealers are now accepting orders for both the 750S coupe, which starts at $332,740, and the 750S Spider, which opens up at $352,740. Deliveries are expected to begin towards the end of this year.


Do you like the 750S's more evolutionary approach?

Image Credits: McLaren
Revealed
Apr 28, 2023
 •

The McLaren 750S Is An Evolved 720S With More Power, Less Weight

It may look the same, but the real changes are found elsewhere.

McLaren's latest supercar looks familar, but for a good reason. The 750S is an evolution of the outgoing 720S, adding to its predecessor's formula rather than shaking it up. In fact, only 30 percent of the components found in the 750S have been upgraded or are competely new, and while a small percent of those parts are for vanity purposes, most of the changes are internal. While you can't see most of these adjustments, they add up to big things you'll undoubtedly notice behind the wheel.




The 4.0 liter V8 heart from the 720S carries over to the 750S, but with higher boost pressure that adds 30 horsepower and 22 lb-ft of torque. Do the math and you have a total of 740 hp and 590 lb-ft of torque, bringing total output closer to the track-oriented 765LT. Larger air intakes along the side of the car contribute to improved engine cooling, while a newly combined dual exhaust setup at the rear is said to make the 750S sound angrier. The seven-speed dual-clutch transmission also benefits from some slight improvements, including a shortened final-drive ratio and the ability to prevent downshifts that would cause the engine to over-rev.



While the 750S gains more power, it manages to shed some weight in the process. Up to 66 pounds, to be exact. One of the biggest contributors would be the new forged wheels, which are offered as standard equipment. McLaren says they are the lightest wheels ever used for a series-production vehicle, and in the 750S's case, they save 30.4 pounds. The 750S also features newly standard carbon fiber racing seats, which shed a whopping 38.6 pounds compared to the 720S. For those who really care about weight, there are even lighter carbon fiber seats available on the options list. Other areas that help with weight reduction are the lighter windshield, column-mounted digital instrument display, and some tweaks to the suspension, which combined save 11.9 pounds. In total, the 750S coupe is 66 pounds lighter than the 720S, while the 750S Spider is just 108 pounds heavier than the coupe.


While convertibles are naturally heavier and thus marginally slower than their fixed-roof counterparts, the 750S Spider manages to hang on tightly to the coupe's numbers. Despite carrying a hefty retractable hardtop along for the ride, it matches the coupe's 2.7-second run from 0 to 60. It also mimics the coupe's top speed of 206 miles per hour.




Meanwhile, a new brake booster and vacuum pump let the 750S screech to a halt faster, while an even more enhanced braking system can be found with a new package that borrows parts from the Senna hypercar. The optional package carbon-ceramic rotors measuring 15.4 inches, as well as one-piece front brake calipers that are said to last longer than typical calipers. Braking at higher speeds has been improved with a lighter active rear wing, which also offers more downforce than the unit found in the 720S.



Just like the exterior, the 750S's cabin doesn't stray too far from the 720S that came before it. Infotainment has been upgraded to an 8-inch touchscreen display that now supports Apple CarPlay, but no Android auto. Other highlights include a Bower & Wilkins stereo system, a newly power-adjustable steering column, customizable ambient lighting, and an optional clear engine cover that allows the driver to see the 750S's glorious V8 in action behind them.


U.S. dealers are now accepting orders for both the 750S coupe, which starts at $332,740, and the 750S Spider, which opens up at $352,740. Deliveries are expected to begin towards the end of this year.


Do you like the 750S's more evolutionary approach?

Image Credits: McLaren

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The McLaren 750S Is An Evolved 720S With More Power, Less Weight

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