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EV Electra, the Canadian-Lebanese startup that swooped in to save the NEVS Emily GT project designed by former Saab engineers, has recently solidified a deal to purchase an automotive production facility in Italy. The company stated it would use the factory to build electric vehicles, though it didn't specify whether that would be the modern Saab it now holds the rights to.


The acquisition of the Italian factory sparked immediate speculation about whether NEVS vehicles would be built there, though a LinkedIn post from chief executive Jihad M. Mohammad addressed the rumors with an air of uncertainty. He asserted that he has not spoken to any members of the media regarding where the Emily GT or any electric models under NEVS would be built.


"Yes, we did make an offer to buy an automotive factory in Italy and finally it was approved yesterday (not the Maserati factory), and in this new venue we will build electric cars that will make everyone shocked," Mohammad wrote. "We have more than [a] few models now, after multiple acquisitions that happened in [the] last two months, and one more is happening this week that will allow us to be on top of our game. I promised my team not to give more details, since our investors need to know before everyone else. Then an official press release will clear all the questions."


If this new factory isn't intended for NEVS, it's possible that EV Electra could be looking to begin production on its own models first. Long before it gained the rights to NEVS, the company had been working on a two-door sports car called the Nostrum, and it was promised that deliveries would begin this August. That won't happen without a factory, so unless the Emily GT project has risen to priority number one, the company is likely using the Italian facility for its existing models.


The Past And Future Of NEVS



Even if this Italian factory won't be churning out Emily GT sedans, not all hope is lost. EV Electra has recently been working to find partners––ideally former Saab dealers––that would be willing to sell NEVS vehicles in their showrooms. The company has also looked into producing vehicles at facilities in Turkey or Sweden, but it appears that neither of those plans have been successful.


The NEVS Emily GT began life as an electric sedan project brought to life by a group of former Saab engineers. At the time, NEVS was fresh out of acquiring the remains of Saab, shortly after the brand closed its doors. The creation of the Emily GT took just ten months, and power was sourced from four electric motors––one motor for each wheel––producing a total of 483 hp. It had a claimed 0-62 mph time of 4.6 seconds, and boasted an impressive 620-mile range thanks to its large 175-kWh battery pack. Unfortunately, the original makers of the Emily GT went defunct about a year ago, and only then was the seemingly doomed project revealed to the world in hopes of finding an investor.


In the time since EV Electra recovered the ashes of NEVS, it has since previewed a coupe, convertible, and wagon to go alongside the original sedan, though it remains to be seen which Emily GT variant will hit the production line first.


Image Credits: NEVS
Report
May 18, 2024
 •

NEVS Emily GT Owner Buys Factory In Italy, So Is The Saab Revival Happening?

While this serves as a glimmer of hope, the company didn't specify what it will build at the facility.

EV Electra, the Canadian-Lebanese startup that swooped in to save the NEVS Emily GT project designed by former Saab engineers, has recently solidified a deal to purchase an automotive production facility in Italy. The company stated it would use the factory to build electric vehicles, though it didn't specify whether that would be the modern Saab it now holds the rights to.


The acquisition of the Italian factory sparked immediate speculation about whether NEVS vehicles would be built there, though a LinkedIn post from chief executive Jihad M. Mohammad addressed the rumors with an air of uncertainty. He asserted that he has not spoken to any members of the media regarding where the Emily GT or any electric models under NEVS would be built.


"Yes, we did make an offer to buy an automotive factory in Italy and finally it was approved yesterday (not the Maserati factory), and in this new venue we will build electric cars that will make everyone shocked," Mohammad wrote. "We have more than [a] few models now, after multiple acquisitions that happened in [the] last two months, and one more is happening this week that will allow us to be on top of our game. I promised my team not to give more details, since our investors need to know before everyone else. Then an official press release will clear all the questions."


If this new factory isn't intended for NEVS, it's possible that EV Electra could be looking to begin production on its own models first. Long before it gained the rights to NEVS, the company had been working on a two-door sports car called the Nostrum, and it was promised that deliveries would begin this August. That won't happen without a factory, so unless the Emily GT project has risen to priority number one, the company is likely using the Italian facility for its existing models.


The Past And Future Of NEVS



Even if this Italian factory won't be churning out Emily GT sedans, not all hope is lost. EV Electra has recently been working to find partners––ideally former Saab dealers––that would be willing to sell NEVS vehicles in their showrooms. The company has also looked into producing vehicles at facilities in Turkey or Sweden, but it appears that neither of those plans have been successful.


The NEVS Emily GT began life as an electric sedan project brought to life by a group of former Saab engineers. At the time, NEVS was fresh out of acquiring the remains of Saab, shortly after the brand closed its doors. The creation of the Emily GT took just ten months, and power was sourced from four electric motors––one motor for each wheel––producing a total of 483 hp. It had a claimed 0-62 mph time of 4.6 seconds, and boasted an impressive 620-mile range thanks to its large 175-kWh battery pack. Unfortunately, the original makers of the Emily GT went defunct about a year ago, and only then was the seemingly doomed project revealed to the world in hopes of finding an investor.


In the time since EV Electra recovered the ashes of NEVS, it has since previewed a coupe, convertible, and wagon to go alongside the original sedan, though it remains to be seen which Emily GT variant will hit the production line first.


Image Credits: NEVS

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NEVS Emily GT Owner Buys Factory In Italy, So Is The Saab Revival Happening?

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