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Nissan, once a pioneer of the early-adopter EV game, now finds itself falling behind in a landscape that's far more competitive than it was ten years ago. Unfortunately, the company has hit another roadblock, with a report from Automotive News citing a supplier memo stating that two electric sedans––one for Nissan, the other for Infiniti––slated to be built at the retooled Canton, Mississippi plant have been delayed to 2027. The initial target for both models was set for 2025.


While Nissan has the new Ariya to hold things over until then––not to mention a trickling of other new EVs that will be built elsewhere––Infiniti has almost nothing to ensure its survival. The electric sedan slated for production at the Canton plant, previewed last year by the Vision Qe, is among the few things the luxury brand hinges on for a second chance, and now that crucial stepping stone has been pushed farther out.




This may be the first time we're hearing about delays for the upcoming EVs, but the supplier document snuffed out by Automotive News indicates that there have been other setbacks in the past. A production schedule from last year revealed that the initial 2025 goalpost had been pushed back by a full year, and since then another five months have been piled on, pushing the release date to around 2027.


The Nissan sedan, expected to adopt the Maxima moniker but codenamed LZ1F for now, will be entering production in November 2026 with the way things are currently going. The news is worse for Infiniti's sedan, codenamed LZ1E, as production of that model won't start until April 2027.


So what exactly is behind all of these postponements, especially with the dire situation going on at Infiniti? Sources obtained by Automotive News claim that Nissan is worried about the waning demand for EVs, and as a result there are concerns about the profitability for the models. As a result, some of the delays made by Nissan are to redress these issues by taking the time to "enhance product competitiveness."


While EV sales reached 1.2 million last year, it's becoming evident that customers are slower to adopt these vehicles than previously expected, with dealer inventory rising considerably in 2023. That said, it's not surprising to hear that Nissan was likely taken aback by these reports, and is deciding to wait around to see if demand picks up the pace.


There is still a chance for EVs to rise in popularity, but there's also the possibility that these delayed models will only end up hurting Nissan and Infiniti. The latter especially, as Infiniti currently does not offer anything remotely battery-powered, not even hybrids. And as for Nissan, the Ariya can't support its EV efforts forever, as it faces bumpy roads in terms of production in Japan, and as of now it does not qualify for U.S. tax credits.




Nonetheless, Nissan remains committed to electrification, even if its current portfolio doesn't quite suggest that. By 2030, the company expects to have much cheaper EVs on its dealer lots, and it plans to begin development of solid-state batteries. It's also worth noting that the Canton-built electric sedans aren't the only new EVs on the agenda, as Nissan is also planning a successor to the Leaf and a new electric SUV for Infiniti. But the question still remains––will these models be hit with the same slow sales that the brand is simultaneously trying to avoid? What's more, will there be a difference in buyers' feelings towards EVs by the time Nissan's sedans reach the market? We only have a few more years left to find out.


Image Credits: Infiniti
Report
Feb 1, 2024
 •

Nissan And Infiniti Delay Their EV Sedans To 2027––Will They Survive Until Then?

A supplier memo reveals the setbacks and concerns that Nissan faces with its upcoming EVs.

Nissan, once a pioneer of the early-adopter EV game, now finds itself falling behind in a landscape that's far more competitive than it was ten years ago. Unfortunately, the company has hit another roadblock, with a report from Automotive News citing a supplier memo stating that two electric sedans––one for Nissan, the other for Infiniti––slated to be built at the retooled Canton, Mississippi plant have been delayed to 2027. The initial target for both models was set for 2025.


While Nissan has the new Ariya to hold things over until then––not to mention a trickling of other new EVs that will be built elsewhere––Infiniti has almost nothing to ensure its survival. The electric sedan slated for production at the Canton plant, previewed last year by the Vision Qe, is among the few things the luxury brand hinges on for a second chance, and now that crucial stepping stone has been pushed farther out.




This may be the first time we're hearing about delays for the upcoming EVs, but the supplier document snuffed out by Automotive News indicates that there have been other setbacks in the past. A production schedule from last year revealed that the initial 2025 goalpost had been pushed back by a full year, and since then another five months have been piled on, pushing the release date to around 2027.


The Nissan sedan, expected to adopt the Maxima moniker but codenamed LZ1F for now, will be entering production in November 2026 with the way things are currently going. The news is worse for Infiniti's sedan, codenamed LZ1E, as production of that model won't start until April 2027.


So what exactly is behind all of these postponements, especially with the dire situation going on at Infiniti? Sources obtained by Automotive News claim that Nissan is worried about the waning demand for EVs, and as a result there are concerns about the profitability for the models. As a result, some of the delays made by Nissan are to redress these issues by taking the time to "enhance product competitiveness."


While EV sales reached 1.2 million last year, it's becoming evident that customers are slower to adopt these vehicles than previously expected, with dealer inventory rising considerably in 2023. That said, it's not surprising to hear that Nissan was likely taken aback by these reports, and is deciding to wait around to see if demand picks up the pace.


There is still a chance for EVs to rise in popularity, but there's also the possibility that these delayed models will only end up hurting Nissan and Infiniti. The latter especially, as Infiniti currently does not offer anything remotely battery-powered, not even hybrids. And as for Nissan, the Ariya can't support its EV efforts forever, as it faces bumpy roads in terms of production in Japan, and as of now it does not qualify for U.S. tax credits.




Nonetheless, Nissan remains committed to electrification, even if its current portfolio doesn't quite suggest that. By 2030, the company expects to have much cheaper EVs on its dealer lots, and it plans to begin development of solid-state batteries. It's also worth noting that the Canton-built electric sedans aren't the only new EVs on the agenda, as Nissan is also planning a successor to the Leaf and a new electric SUV for Infiniti. But the question still remains––will these models be hit with the same slow sales that the brand is simultaneously trying to avoid? What's more, will there be a difference in buyers' feelings towards EVs by the time Nissan's sedans reach the market? We only have a few more years left to find out.


Image Credits: Infiniti

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Nissan And Infiniti Delay Their EV Sedans To 2027––Will They Survive Until Then?

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