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BMW's first standalone M car since the M1 is no supercar. Instead, it's the controversially-designed XM plug-in hybrid crossover. However, what if we told you that this almost wasn't the case? BMW design boss Domagoj Dukec revealed on social media that the brand was very close to producing a brawny supercar called the I16, before the events of 2020 led to the project's untimely death.


BMW i16

BMW i16

Now that we're getting a good look at the modern-day BMW supercar that never was, we can see that it was largely inspired by the Vision M Next concept car, which in itself was meant to be a new interpretation of the original M1. The styling of the I16 also brings to mind the quirky i8 hybrid, which ended production around the same time as this model's cancellation.


The I16 was clearly conceived before BMW decided to create its dreadful series of large grilles and split headlights. It's a refreshing departure from the XM that would eventually take its place, donning a conservative set of kidney grilles, razor-thin taillights, and M1-inspired BMW roundels. The design isn't without a few distinctive elements, however, as it carries over the striking orange two-tone color scheme that debuted on the Vision M Next. There are also several sharp creases throughout the car that hide the air intakes.


Dukec didn't say much about what came under the hood, but reports circulating around the time of the I16's development indicate that it would follow its i8 predecessor in offering a plug-in hybrid powertrain. It was supposed to offer huge improvements in terms of power and electric range, with its turbo-four engine and electric motors producing a total of 600 hp and offering fully-electric range of over 60 miles.


BMW i16

According to Dukec, the I16 was developed by BMW in a time frame of less than 12 months. This was thanks to the continued use of the carbon monocoque chassis from the i8. However, by the time the BMW i8 ended production in 2020, its I16 successor had already been shelved.


Dukec insinuated that the cancellation was partially caused by the COVID-19 outbreak. "While we pushed, the world changed in 2020," he said. "And so, work on the project unfortunately had to be stopped." While the premature demise of the I16 is very disappointing, Dukex remains hopeful, mentioning that "there’s always a new project waiting around the corner."


Image Credits: BMW
Report
Feb 25, 2024
 •

The I16 Is BMW's New-Age M1 Successor That Never Made It To Production

The plug-in hybrid supercar was allegedly cancelled back in 2020.

BMW's first standalone M car since the M1 is no supercar. Instead, it's the controversially-designed XM plug-in hybrid crossover. However, what if we told you that this almost wasn't the case? BMW design boss Domagoj Dukec revealed on social media that the brand was very close to producing a brawny supercar called the I16, before the events of 2020 led to the project's untimely death.


BMW i16

BMW i16

Now that we're getting a good look at the modern-day BMW supercar that never was, we can see that it was largely inspired by the Vision M Next concept car, which in itself was meant to be a new interpretation of the original M1. The styling of the I16 also brings to mind the quirky i8 hybrid, which ended production around the same time as this model's cancellation.


The I16 was clearly conceived before BMW decided to create its dreadful series of large grilles and split headlights. It's a refreshing departure from the XM that would eventually take its place, donning a conservative set of kidney grilles, razor-thin taillights, and M1-inspired BMW roundels. The design isn't without a few distinctive elements, however, as it carries over the striking orange two-tone color scheme that debuted on the Vision M Next. There are also several sharp creases throughout the car that hide the air intakes.


Dukec didn't say much about what came under the hood, but reports circulating around the time of the I16's development indicate that it would follow its i8 predecessor in offering a plug-in hybrid powertrain. It was supposed to offer huge improvements in terms of power and electric range, with its turbo-four engine and electric motors producing a total of 600 hp and offering fully-electric range of over 60 miles.


BMW i16

According to Dukec, the I16 was developed by BMW in a time frame of less than 12 months. This was thanks to the continued use of the carbon monocoque chassis from the i8. However, by the time the BMW i8 ended production in 2020, its I16 successor had already been shelved.


Dukec insinuated that the cancellation was partially caused by the COVID-19 outbreak. "While we pushed, the world changed in 2020," he said. "And so, work on the project unfortunately had to be stopped." While the premature demise of the I16 is very disappointing, Dukex remains hopeful, mentioning that "there’s always a new project waiting around the corner."


Image Credits: BMW

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The I16 Is BMW's New-Age M1 Successor That Never Made It To Production

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