top of page

The Porsche Panamera has new entered its third generation, and while things look reassuringly familiar on the outside, you'll find a lot of changes under the hood and behind the doors. Things start off with the rear-wheel drive base Panamera, followed by the Panamera 4, which comes with all-wheel drive as standard. Moving to the top of the ladder will bring you to the Turbo E-Hybrid, though even more powerful variants will arrive later on. What's not coming, however, is the Panamera's stunning Sport Turismo wagon, which has been dropped citing poor sales.



The lower end of the Panamera lineup is powered by a turbocharged 2.9 liter V6, which was already offered on last year's model but has been tuned to raise output from 325 hp to 348 hp, along with 37 more lb-ft of torque for a new total of 368 lb-ft. The four-door Porsche connects that engine to an eight-speed PDK dual-clutch automatic transmission. The automaker says that base models will make it from 0-60 mph in just 5.0 seconds, while the Panamera 4 shaves it down to 4.7 seconds.


The more exciting powertrain is the 670-hp twin-turbo V8, which is found solely in the Turbo E-Hybrid model. Porsche promises a total of four different E-Hybrid models for the new Panamera, but the Turbo is the only one available so far. It marks all-wheel drive as standard, with an updated eight-speed PDK dual-clutch transmission sending power from that aforementioned V8, which has also been upgraded to integrate single-scroll turbos. The Turbo E-Hybrid also gains a larger battery pack than before, and the PDK-mounted electric motor has been promoted to deliver 187 hp. This all makes for a total of 670 hp and 685 lb-ft of torque (and a 0-60 mph time of just 3.0 seconds, before reaching its 195-mph top speed), though a forthcoming Turbo S Panamera is expected to exceed 700 horses.


As for the E-Hybrid's electrical stuff, the 370-volt system consists of a 21.8-kWh battery pack, which can be juiced up in around two hours when using the sedan's upgraded 11.0-kWh onboard charger. Range from this battery could sit at around 30 miles.



The Turbo E-Hybrid isn't without some party tricks, as it features an optional Active Ride suspension system that ditches anti-roll bars in favor of a combo of single-chamber air springs and hydraulically-linked cylinders. This setup is highly adaptable to deliver any kind of driving experience, including supple body control for sportier drive settings and gentler movements for the rest. For example, the model's default Hybrid setting boasts the ability to lean into corners in a way not dissimilar to motorcycles, and it can also tilt forward or backward as a response to acceleration and braking forces. You don't have to be behind the wheel to reap the benefits either, as Active Ride can also help you get there. Upon opening the doors, the Panamera will raise itself by as much as 2.2 inches to make getting in and out easier, and ground clearance will drop back to its standard setting when the doors close.


If you're not about to spend well over six figures on the Turbo E-Hybrid, the other Panameras offer their own advanced suspension setups as well. All non-hybrid, non-Turbo models are equipped with new two-chamber air springs and adaptive dampers, and even more graceful driving manners can be achieved by opting for the sedan's available rear-axle steering.




As for the changes on the outside, the Panamera retains its long, sloping roofline and clear connections to the rest of the Porsche lineup. There are plenty of echoes from the refreshed Cayenne SUV, including squarer headlights and a more streamlined look for the connected taillights. The rest of the front fascia gains larger intakes and a sharper nose, along with a more pronounced bumper in the rear. On the Turbo E-Hybrid, Porsche has implemented its new Turbonite badging, which supplants the traditional crest emblem with a grayscale hue on all Turbo models going forward.




Stepping inside reveals vast upgrades as well, though Porsche already revealed the Panamera's new cabin earlier this month. Highlights include a newly-optional 10.9" front passenger display, a hoodless 12.6" digital gauge cluster, and a new dash-mounted gear selector. The 10.9" central display houses a new infotainment system, which makes better use of the MyPorsche app when Apple CarPlay or Android Auto is enabled. Elsewhere, Porsche has moved a number of controls to the steering wheel, and the seats are said to have comfier foam padding underneath a broader selection of upholstery options.


Continuing with the theme of technology, the Panamera follows the all-electric Taycan in adding a self-park functionality that can be controlled through the driver's smartphone. Porsche has also made improvements to the sedan's adaptive cruise control, alongside an upgraded host of driver-assistance features.


Prices start at a steep $101,550 for the entry-level 2024 Panamera, if you'd even call a six-figure car "entry-level," and it rises up to $108,550 for the Panamera 4. Order books for these models are open as we speak, and deliveries will commence in spring 2024. The Turbo E-Hybrid will arrive later, and while we don't have pricing details on this particular model, there's a chance that it could enter the $200,000 threshold.


Do you prefer the third-gen model over its predecessor?

Image Credits: Porsche
Revealed
Dec 1, 2023
 •

2024 Porsche Panamera Adds A Bit Of Everything But Loses The Wagon

Buyers can choose from a 348-hp 2.9 liter turbo-six or the Turbo E-Hybrid's 670-hp twin-turbo V8.

The Porsche Panamera has new entered its third generation, and while things look reassuringly familiar on the outside, you'll find a lot of changes under the hood and behind the doors. Things start off with the rear-wheel drive base Panamera, followed by the Panamera 4, which comes with all-wheel drive as standard. Moving to the top of the ladder will bring you to the Turbo E-Hybrid, though even more powerful variants will arrive later on. What's not coming, however, is the Panamera's stunning Sport Turismo wagon, which has been dropped citing poor sales.



The lower end of the Panamera lineup is powered by a turbocharged 2.9 liter V6, which was already offered on last year's model but has been tuned to raise output from 325 hp to 348 hp, along with 37 more lb-ft of torque for a new total of 368 lb-ft. The four-door Porsche connects that engine to an eight-speed PDK dual-clutch automatic transmission. The automaker says that base models will make it from 0-60 mph in just 5.0 seconds, while the Panamera 4 shaves it down to 4.7 seconds.


The more exciting powertrain is the 670-hp twin-turbo V8, which is found solely in the Turbo E-Hybrid model. Porsche promises a total of four different E-Hybrid models for the new Panamera, but the Turbo is the only one available so far. It marks all-wheel drive as standard, with an updated eight-speed PDK dual-clutch transmission sending power from that aforementioned V8, which has also been upgraded to integrate single-scroll turbos. The Turbo E-Hybrid also gains a larger battery pack than before, and the PDK-mounted electric motor has been promoted to deliver 187 hp. This all makes for a total of 670 hp and 685 lb-ft of torque (and a 0-60 mph time of just 3.0 seconds, before reaching its 195-mph top speed), though a forthcoming Turbo S Panamera is expected to exceed 700 horses.


As for the E-Hybrid's electrical stuff, the 370-volt system consists of a 21.8-kWh battery pack, which can be juiced up in around two hours when using the sedan's upgraded 11.0-kWh onboard charger. Range from this battery could sit at around 30 miles.



The Turbo E-Hybrid isn't without some party tricks, as it features an optional Active Ride suspension system that ditches anti-roll bars in favor of a combo of single-chamber air springs and hydraulically-linked cylinders. This setup is highly adaptable to deliver any kind of driving experience, including supple body control for sportier drive settings and gentler movements for the rest. For example, the model's default Hybrid setting boasts the ability to lean into corners in a way not dissimilar to motorcycles, and it can also tilt forward or backward as a response to acceleration and braking forces. You don't have to be behind the wheel to reap the benefits either, as Active Ride can also help you get there. Upon opening the doors, the Panamera will raise itself by as much as 2.2 inches to make getting in and out easier, and ground clearance will drop back to its standard setting when the doors close.


If you're not about to spend well over six figures on the Turbo E-Hybrid, the other Panameras offer their own advanced suspension setups as well. All non-hybrid, non-Turbo models are equipped with new two-chamber air springs and adaptive dampers, and even more graceful driving manners can be achieved by opting for the sedan's available rear-axle steering.




As for the changes on the outside, the Panamera retains its long, sloping roofline and clear connections to the rest of the Porsche lineup. There are plenty of echoes from the refreshed Cayenne SUV, including squarer headlights and a more streamlined look for the connected taillights. The rest of the front fascia gains larger intakes and a sharper nose, along with a more pronounced bumper in the rear. On the Turbo E-Hybrid, Porsche has implemented its new Turbonite badging, which supplants the traditional crest emblem with a grayscale hue on all Turbo models going forward.




Stepping inside reveals vast upgrades as well, though Porsche already revealed the Panamera's new cabin earlier this month. Highlights include a newly-optional 10.9" front passenger display, a hoodless 12.6" digital gauge cluster, and a new dash-mounted gear selector. The 10.9" central display houses a new infotainment system, which makes better use of the MyPorsche app when Apple CarPlay or Android Auto is enabled. Elsewhere, Porsche has moved a number of controls to the steering wheel, and the seats are said to have comfier foam padding underneath a broader selection of upholstery options.


Continuing with the theme of technology, the Panamera follows the all-electric Taycan in adding a self-park functionality that can be controlled through the driver's smartphone. Porsche has also made improvements to the sedan's adaptive cruise control, alongside an upgraded host of driver-assistance features.


Prices start at a steep $101,550 for the entry-level 2024 Panamera, if you'd even call a six-figure car "entry-level," and it rises up to $108,550 for the Panamera 4. Order books for these models are open as we speak, and deliveries will commence in spring 2024. The Turbo E-Hybrid will arrive later, and while we don't have pricing details on this particular model, there's a chance that it could enter the $200,000 threshold.


Do you prefer the third-gen model over its predecessor?

Image Credits: Porsche

More From 

Revealed

Subaru Still Won't Give Us Another STI, But You Can Have This WRX tS Instead

Subaru Still Won't Give Us Another STI, But You Can Have This WRX tS Instead

Alfa Romeo Sends Off Quadrifoglio V6 With Super Sport Limited Editions

Alfa Romeo Sends Off Quadrifoglio V6 With Super Sport Limited Editions

2025 Corvette Adds A Splash Of Color With New Yellow, Orange, Purple Options

2025 Corvette Adds A Splash Of Color With New Yellow, Orange, Purple Options

2024 Porsche Panamera Adds A Bit Of Everything But Loses The Wagon

Sign up for our newsletter.

Get industry updates sent straight to you, designed to offer a simple glance at the motoring world.

bottom of page